Scottish Euros song No Scotland No Party goes viral in Argentina

By Jamie Russell, BBC Scotland News • Suzanne Allan, BBC Scotland reporter

BBC

Nick Morgan, a postman from Prestwick, is the singer behind Scotland’s new unofficial Euros anthem

Football fans from Argentina and Scotland are united in music thanks to a catchy Euros track written by a Scottish postman.

The song called “No Scotland No Party” has attracted attention from 7,000 miles away because it is sung to the tune of a popular Argentine song about sporting icon Diego Maradona.

Nick Morgan’s Euros song quickly went viral on TikTok with over four million views and has been played by Argentinian TV and radio stations.

Nick, a Kilmarnock fan, said: “It’s been crazy. People thanking me and saying they’re now supporting Scotland at the Euros, some people saying they’re buying Scotland strips for when they’re playing.

“It’s just surreal to be honest, to think across the globe people in South America are listening to the track and it’s been talked about on TV and on radio.

“I’ve been sent loads of articles. It’s been big national newspapers, it’s not small stations, it’s the big time. It is hard to take in.”

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Nick got the idea after seeing a video of Maradona, who captained the 1986 World Cup-winning side, after he died in 2020.

“It came about when Maradona passed away and [there were] loads of tributes, ” he said.

“I found this clip of Maradona singing in a bar and his whole family is there, and friends, and there’s a rock band behind him.

“There was just this song… and as soon as I heard it, I fell in love with it, it’s just so catchy.”

The original song called “La mano de Dios” or “The Hand of God” was released in 2001 by late Argentine singer Rodrigo Bueno as a tribute to Maradona, widely regarded as one of the best footballers of all time.

It references the striker’s notorious handball goal against England in the 1986 World Cup quarter final in Mexico.

Maradona, who also starred for Barcelona and Napoli, went on to manage the Argentine national team.

And, ironically, he won his first match in charge against Scotland at Hampden in 2008.

While the original track is popular in Argentina, it was relatively unknown in Scotland until Nick released his tartan-tinted version.

He said: “In this song I pay homage to Argentina.

“The theme of the song is basically we know we’re not this amazing team, we know we’re not Argentina, we’re not world champions, but we’ve got these amazing players and we’ve got this belief.”

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Argentina media outlets have reported on the Scottish Euro’s track

Nick’s track references Scotland’s historic successes and losses at major tournaments over the years.

In the chorus he chants: “But we got John McGinn , and Robbo out on the wing ,” in reference to two of Scotland’s star players.

It even acknowledges the nations pessimistic excitement after failing to pass the group stages three times.

“We never seem to do too well, I guess that time will tell. If we are finally, gonna make it, through the group stage.”

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Nick released his Scottish Euros anthem on 17 May and quickly found support – not just from the Tartan Army, but from South America.

“I got a message from an Instagram account and they basically just said we love your track – expect this to blow up in Argentina,” he told BBC Scotland News.

“It said people were going to love this and then I just started getting sent newspaper articles from Argentina, friend requests.”

His YouTube streams shot through the roof.

With 200,000 Tartan Army fans expected to arrive in Germany for the Euros, it has been adopted as the unofficial theme song among Scottish supporters.

And it has also been embraced by fans of Argentina, the reigning world and South American champions.

Nick has been delivering acoustic renditions of the song at local primary schools as part of the build up to Euro 2024.

And he has been trying to keep on top of his media fame in between.

He explained: “I am a musician. I work from 09:30 to 15:30 but the last week or two has been crazy so I have been coming straight home, replying to emails, doing interviews.

“People are asking for voice messages for their uncle. It’s wild.

“Fanzones are asking me to do messages, it’s hard fitting it all in.”

Andy Cameron made it to Top of the Pops with Ally’s Tartan Army

Previous Scotland football songs include Ally’s Tartan Army for the 1978 World Cup campaign or We Have a Dream from the 1982 World Cup.

Nick said: “If it was just this I would be happy.

“For an independent artist it’s tough getting airplay.

“I’d like longevity with the song. I would love in a year or two’s time whenever Scotland play the song, it becomes like ‘We’re on the March with Ally’s Army’.

“It’s tough writing a song for Scotland, it’s not my usual genre, but it’s a fine line between cheesy-cringey and a nice patriotic song, so you’ve just got to fit it right in the middle. I think I’ve managed it.”

Steve Clarke’s side kick off Euro 2024 against hosts Germany in Munich at 20:00 on Friday.

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